What I Happen to Be Reading At the Moment

"A thirteen-year-old is a kaleidoscope of different personalities, if not in most ways a mere figment of her own imagination. At that age, what and who you are depends largely on what book you happen to be reading at the moment.”

 

While not 13 anymore, the desire to read almost anything and everything in order to read for fun and for experience is still around. I'm currently working on my PhD in a physical science, but I love to read and books are one of my non-science hobbies.

The Scientist as Rebel - Freeman John Dyson Benjamin Franklin combined better than anyone else the qualities of a great scientist and a great rebel. As a scientist, without formal education or inherited wealth, he beat the learned aristocrats of Europe at their own game...Franklin became a rebel only when he judged the time to be right and the costs acceptable...The rebellion that Franklin embodied was a thoughtful rebellion, driven by reason and calculation more than by passion and hatred. While only a handful of essays follow the theme of the title essay, Freeman Dyson's The Scientist as Rebel encompasses Dyson's views on science, popular science fiction, and history. Dyson's often needling wit displays itself when discussing Thomas Gold's theories being rejected by others in the field (but also his other theories that missed the mark) or when breaking down the scientific flaws in Crichton's Prey (the nanobots would be unable to fly because air on that scale becomes extremely viscous). Dyson is not on a power trip of his own making, though, instead analyzing how science progresses and is portrayed. Occasionally taking a diversion into history or other topics, Dyson's examination of the history and history of science in the latter half of the 20th century is engaging and interesting. Also, with an introduction that starts out using Benjamin Franklin as a prototype of the scientist as rebel, it's difficult to go wrong.

Currently reading

Native Son
Richard Wright
The Great Glass Sea
Josh Weil
The Elder Edda
Anonymous, Andrew Orchard