What I Happen to Be Reading At the Moment

"A thirteen-year-old is a kaleidoscope of different personalities, if not in most ways a mere figment of her own imagination. At that age, what and who you are depends largely on what book you happen to be reading at the moment.”

 

While not 13 anymore, the desire to read almost anything and everything in order to read for fun and for experience is still around. I'm currently working on my PhD in a physical science, but I love to read and books are one of my non-science hobbies.

My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop - My Bookstore is some ways is a highly self-congratulatory exercise in authors priding themselves in going to independent, local shops and avoiding online retailers of books. In other ways, My Bookstore is a celebration of people who are passionate about books, whether primarily authors, readers, or booksellers. Both of these things come through in many of the essays, and the afterword strongly echoes the anti-online retailer sentiment. The flaws out of the way, I think I've discovered a travel guide for when I visit the cities with their bookstores featured. Some of the independent bookstores included in this anthology are expected (Powell's, Harvard Bookstore, The Strand) and some less so (my hometown indie, Village Books, was included and that was a reason why I decided to read it). The essays are appreciations of places where booksellers are more than just people who sell customers something and are fixtures in the community. Many of these authors writing these appreciations owe their subsequent novels to the word of mouth their independent booksellers generated for them. Others have appreciated that these bookstores are also meeting places for readers and authors, or where kids go to discover the joy of reading.Reading books about people who like books is fun and reminds me that there are so many more bookish places to explore.

Currently reading

Native Son
Richard Wright
The Great Glass Sea
Josh Weil
The Elder Edda
Anonymous, Andrew Orchard